17 Mar

Another Photo ~ Operation Swarmer Going After Insurgents




OPERATION SWARMER — A U.S. Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter transports U.S. Army soldiers of the 101st Airborne Division’s Company C, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment and Iraqi army soldiers during Operation Swarmer in Brassfield-Mora, Iraq, March 16, 2006. Operation Swarmer is a combined air assault operation to clear the area northeast of Samarra of suspected insurgents. (U.S. Navy Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Shawn Hussong)

16 Mar

Operation Swarmer LOVE it! & Other Photos Of Our Awesome Troops!

101st Airborne Division stand ready with a staged row of Blackhawk helicopters in preparation for Operation Swarmer, in Remagen, Iraq




BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) — U.S. forces joined by Iraqi troops on Thursday launched the largest air assault since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, targeting insurgent strongholds north of the capital, the military said.
The U.S. military said the air- and ground-offensive dubbed Operation Swarmer was aimed at clearing “a suspected insurgent operating area” northeast of Samarra and was expected to continue over several days.
Residents in the targeted area said there was a heavy U.S. and Iraqi troop presence in the area and large explosions could be heard in the distance. It was unclear if the blasts were due to fighting.
The military termed the operation the largest air assault since the invasion nearly three years ago, but it was not clear if any U.S. aircraft opened fire during the operation or if there had been any insurgent resistance.
“More than 1,500 Iraqi and Coalition troops, over 200 tactical vehicles, and more than 50 aircraft participated in the operation,” the military statement said.
The U.S. command in Baghdad said it was the largest number of aircraft used to insert troops and the largest number of troops inserted by air, although larger numbers of troops overall have been involved in previous operations.









Operating Base Remagen, with Operation Swarmer on March 16th, American heroes in helicopters take off with Iraqi and Coalition forces to wipe out terrorists northeast of Samarra in the largest air assault since the U.S.-led liberation of Iraq.
North of Baghdad., under a massive airborne operation involving over 50 aircraft and 1,500 heroic American and Iraqi troops.
North of Baghdad., Iraqi soldiers secure a bridge during curfew as the Iraqi parliament convened for the first time with pressure against it from Iran, al Qaeda and the American MSM. The targets are terrorist rebels, including those of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.



In Basra, Iraq, at the market of military equipment, where terrorists have repeatedly put on military uniforms to carry out terrorist murders.




Wild Thing’s comment……
I am so proud of our troops!

* BIG DOG says Let Allah Sort Them Out
* The Rolling Barrage

16 Mar

Thank you for your patience




Today my site was attacked. It was down for awhile, then when it did come up it was not loading the pages. It kept saying page not found. It felt like being where I knew the door was and no house was standing there. hahaha
Thank you all for your patience and I am sorry some of you had to do reposts several times to get them to show up for me to give the OK to when I did get my site back up.
It is still running very slow so I hope it will get healthy again. ugh!
So Welcome and come on in

Wild Thing

16 Mar

Hanoi Jane Encounter




I received an email asking me how I felt about posting about Hanoi Jane. I told her I would do a post about it in case anyone else was curious. She wondered why I ” bothered” as she put it.
America has way too much apathy, way too much tolerance for traitors. They are not punished, they are even admired by some of the low life in our country. Remember the week that Gore was in Saudi Arabia with Clinton and others and sounded off on America. Committing treason as far as I am concerned. The same week Cheney had the shooting accident. We never heard the media about Gore, I only knew about it because of being online. But Cheney was bombarded on every network, every channel, every news and political talk show on TV. You would have thought he had been gunning for someone, tracking the person and then killing him.
It is like America is upside down or something.
During the Vietnam War it sickened me and angered me beyond words how I felt about Hanoi Jane, Donald Sutherland,Gregory Peck and others how they were traitors to not only America but our troops. I swore I would never let up on what they did, never stop telling the world just how vile they were and are, and how they should be punished.
One of the times I came back from Vietnam, some friends of mine, Vietnam Veterans that had just gotten back from Nam told me how they had driven their motorcycles up the coast of California and put the Hanoi Jane stickers in the urinals in the bathrooms at gas stations along the way. We all had a good laugh and I complimented them on what a great idea it was.
One of the trips back home Bob Hope and I were standing outside a building where we had just had a meeting to talk about a trip coming up and a man walked right up to Bob Hope and spit in his face. It landed on his collar bone. Bob Hope stood there and told the guy, ” that’s not enough nerve to enlist, you have to be a man.” The guy ran off.
Year later, in the early 80’s I was leaving the gym I went to and Hanoi Jane was standing outside talking to someone. I wondered why the heck she was there. This gym I went to was Gold’s Gym in Venice, you know the bodybuilding Mecca gym. She had a workout place in Beverly Hills, called Jane Fonda’s Workout.
I stood by the door of the gym till the person she was talking to walked away. Then I walked right up to her with a purpose in my steps. I am 5’11 and Hanoi Jane is 5’7″. So I had 4 inches on her, I got as close as I could, so she could feel my breath on her. I stood as tall as I could, you know when you stand there and really stretch out your back, perfect posture etc.? Yep that is what I did, wishing right then that I was taller then 5’11 just this one time in my life.
Hanoi Jane:She looked up and asked,” You’re a tall girl, do you want something?”
Wild Thing: Yes, Jane I need to tell you something. I have a message for you from over 2,000,000 Americans that served in uniform in Vietnam during the Vietnam War.
Hanoi Jane: You have a lot of nerve!
Wild Thing: Yes I do, these 2 million have my six and that is my ass, my back in case you do not know. They are very pissed off at you. And so am I, so I have to let you know from them and myself that we don’t think you are a traitor, we KNOW you are.
And from me to you I will never forgive you for what you did, for the actions you took and for the words you spoke. You will take those things to hell when you die. But not only that, you will take the responsibility of the deaths you caused, the beatings and treatment you caused our troops by the enemy with you as well. Every drop of blood, every bead of sweat, every pain in their limbs and bodies that you caused them to be tortured and maimed. Every broken heart, every lost loved one left behind.
Hanoi Jane: ( interrupting) you do have guts I will give you that. I am not embarrassed by what I did, nor sorry. I believed in what I did then and still do today. You are wrong and Americans were murderers. You are condoning their murder as I see it.
Wild Thing: No, but I would condone your being punished for treason. Have you ever heard of the Rosenberg’s? They were executed in 1938 for treason. Am I getting warm here in you knowing how I think you should be punished?
Hanoi Jane: she nodded and stayed silent
Wild Thing: Good then I will just end this conversation with this. You use this country, you use our military Jane. You use the freedoms that you have as if it cost nothing. You and your ilk are not why this is the land of the free. You and your ilk are not why our military and all the way back to our forefathers went through what they did to make sure we have the greatest Nation in the world. We were not defeated in the Vietnam War Jane, our troops won that war. It was our politicians, the lying media, and the communists in our country that lost the war, the cowards and the enemy of America that walk our streets like you.
You will never understand, I know this. This was a meeting in time that had to be,not for you, but for my Vietnam Veterans, and for me to tell you just what I think of you.
The courage, determination, camaraderie, selflessness they own and you never will. They are America’s heroes something you will never understand. I despise you Jane you are not worth one gasp of air that you breath. I hope we never run into each other again. But these things needed to be said to your face, up close and personal.

After this I went home, I was shaking a little not because of meeting her but because I was so angry. Nick said to write it down as best I could so I would not forget what I said but also what she said. So I did and saved it.
Having a blog is also an excellent way of keeping track of things happening in the world. News and information of all kinds of things. Anything I post about Hanoi Jane will always be listed in my sidebar under Traitors To America.
There are also some pages at my personal website that mention Hanoi Jane, so Melinda maybe you would like to check them out as well. Read the posts here on this blog too, posts made by Veterans that walk the walk.Men, real men every one of them, and each one that you should feel honored to be in their presence. If you do then you will never again say or think why bother.
Extreme Prejudice…The Red Zone
My Tribute to Vietnam Veterans
PC Free Zone Gazette Page
And then Melinda go to my POW/MIA page and Never Forget, Never.

16 Mar

Feel The Love Ahmadinejad ~ Not!




Iran-nuclear-cartoon: The price of a Iran’s nuclear weapon
The following cartoon appeared in Friday’s edition of the London-based Arabic daily Asharq al-Awsat. The word “Iran” is written on the cleric’s turban.
Iran says will not abide by Security Council demands
Iran will not abide by likely demands from the United Nations Security Council to suspend its uranium enrichment activities, Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid-Reza Asefi told reporters on Wednesday.

16 Mar

But…But You Wouldn’t Lie To Us Would You Ahmadinejad??

He sure as heck would and has, it must be in one of the verses in the Quran 101! Ya think? haha What else is new a lying Arab.
Iran’s Ahmadinejad: West opposes our nukes to let Israel live on
Tehran, Iran, Mar. 15 – Iran’s radical President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said on Wednesday that the circumstances were ripe for the “collapse of the Zionist regime” and that the West was highlighting the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program in the world arena in order to “divert attention away from the issue of Palestine”.
“The regime occupying Qods (Jerusalem) was set up to create insecurity and confrontation in our region. If one day tranquillity came about, it would mean the death of this regime”, Ahmadinejad said in the northern town of Ramyan during a speech broadcast live on state television.
“Our enemies on the one hand oppose our nation’s acquisition of nuclear energy and on the other hand want to divert the attention of other nations from the key issue of Palestine to give an opportunity to the Zionist regime to prolong its existence”, he said.

16 Mar

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

On Jeopardy the other night, the final question was How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the tomb of the Unknowns —— All three contestants missed it.
This is really an awesome sight to watch if you’ve never had the chance….Very fascinating




1. How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the tomb of the Unknowns and why?
21 steps. It alludes to the twenty-one gun salute, which is the highest honor given any military or foreign dignitary.
2. How long does he hesitate after his about face to begin his return walk and why?
21 seconds for the same reason as answer number 1



3. Why are his gloves wet?
His gloves are moistened to prevent his losing his grip on the rifle



4. Does he carry his rifle on the same shoulder all the time and if not, why not?
He carries the rifle on the shoulder away from the tomb. After his march across the path, he executes an about face and moves the rifle to the outside shoulder.
5. How often are the guards changed?
Guards are changed every thirty minutes, twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year.
6. What are the physical traits of the guard limited to?
For a person to apply for guard duty at the tomb, he must be between 5′ 10″ and 6′ 2″ tall and his waist size cannot exceed 30.” Other requirements of the Guard: They must commit 2 years of life to guard the tomb, live in a barracks under the tomb, and cannot drink any alcohol on or off duty for the rest of their lives. They cannot swear in public for the rest of their lives and cannot disgrace the uniform {fighting} or the tomb in any way. After two years, the guard is given a wreath pin that is worn on their lapel signifying they served as guard of the tomb. There are only 400 presently worn. The guard must obey these rules for the rest of their lives or give up the wreath pin.
The shoes are specially made with very thick soles to keep the heat and cold from their feet. There are metal heel plates that extend to the top of the shoe in order to make the loud click as they come to a halt. There are no wrinkles, folds or lint on the uniform. Guards dress for duty in front of a full-length mirror.
The first six months of duty a guard cannot talk to anyone, nor watch TV. All off duty time is spent studying the 175 notable people laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery . A guard must memorize who they are and where they are interred. Among the notables are: President Taft, Joe E. Lewis {the boxer} and Medal of Honor winner Audie Murphy, {the most decorated soldier of WWII}.
Every guard spends five hours a day getting his uniforms ready for guard duty.



ETERNAL REST GRANT THEM O LORD, AND LET PERPETUAL LIGHT SHINE UPON THEM.
In 2003 as Hurricane Isabelle was approaching Washington , DC, our US Senate/House took 2 days off with anticipation of the storm. On the ABC evening news, it was reported that because of the dangers from the hurricane, the military members assigned the duty of guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier were given permission to suspend the assignment. They respectfully declined the offer, “No way, Sir!” Soaked to the skin,
marching in the pelting rain of a tropical storm, they said that guarding the Tomb was not just an assignment, it was the highest honor that can be afforded to a serviceperson. The tomb has been patrolled continuously,
24/7, since 1930.

16 Mar

Thank You Senator Douglas ~ May Hanoi Jane Rot In Hell!




Atlanta Journal Constitution
Jane Fonda’s name still raises the blood pressure of many Georgia veterans more than 30 years after her famous pose on a North Vietnamese anti-aircraft gun.
So the idea of honoring “Hanoi Jane” for her recent charitable and public service work didn’t go over too well with at least one member of the Georgia Senate on Wednesday.
Sen. Steen Miles (D-Decatur) (steen.miles@senate.ga.gov) introduced a resolution recognizing the two-time Academy Award-winning actress for her efforts to help women and children globally, particularly her work as the founder and chairwoman of the Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention.
Senate Resolution 1189 seemed to breeze through the Senate without a raising an eyebrow — as do hundreds of honorary and commemorative resolutions each year. There’s no vote on these types of quick resolutions, and lawmakers very rarely object to them.
But Sen. John Douglas (R-Covington), (john.douglas@senate.ga.gov) a retired Army Major and the chairman of the Senate Veterans and Military Affairs Committee, stood as the Senate was adjourning and briefly voiced his strong opposition to the resolution.
His words provoked a strong response from Miles, who argued that Fonda’s work deserved recognition. “We have been very, very hypocritical when it comes to taking care of the least of these and the lost,” Miles said.
Miles’ speech, however, may have backfired. When she wrapped up, Douglas immediately made a motion for the Senate to reconsider its approval of SR 1189. The Senate will decide at 9 a.m. today.



Douglas had harsh words later in the day for Fonda, who has said she regretted the gesture on the anti-aircraft gun. “I think Jane Fonda is less worthy than any living American to be honored by our Senate and the people of Georgia,” Douglas said. “It starts off with her actions during the Vietnam War and it continues today. No amount of good work now will make up for her past actions against the military and our country.”

April, 1973 — Hanoi Jane Fonda calls the freed American prisoners “hypocrites and pawns,” insisting that…….
“Tortured men do not march smartly off planes, salute the flag, and kiss their wives. They are liars. I also want to say that these men are not heroes.”

“We were elated when Jane Fonda, wearing a red Vietnamese dress, said at a press conference that she was
ashamed of American actions in the war, and that she would struggle along with us.” –
Bui Tin, Colonel, People’s Army of Vietnam (PAVN)

Wild Thing’s comment……
Thank God for men like Senator Douglas.

15 Mar

It’s Legal

.

Wild Thing’s comment………..
This is excellent! Long article but well worth it.

.

National Review Online
Bryon York
EDITOR’S NOTE: On Monday, when Wisconsin Democratic Sen. Russ Feingold introduced a resolution to censure President Bush, he said, “When the President of the United States breaks the law, he must be held accountable.” Bush, Feingold continued, “authorized an illegal program to spy on American citizens on American soil and then misled the Congress and the public about the existence and the legality of that program.” Although few Democrats have joined Feingold’s call for censure, nearly all of them agree with Feingold’s contention that the surveillance program is illegal. But the president’s adversaries overlook the solid legal basis for the administration’s actions.
The solid legal basis for the administration’s surveillance program.
In early September 2002, just before the first anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks, a group of lawyers gathered in a heavily protected, windowless room in the Department of Justice building in Washington. There were three federal appeals-court judges, Laurence Silberman, Edward Leavy, and Ralph Guy. There was Theodore Olson, the U.S. solicitor general. There was Larry Thompson, the deputy attorney general. And there was John Yoo, the Justice official who had closely studied questions of war powers and presidential authority. Rounding out the group were a few other department staffers, one official from the FBI, and David Addington, Vice President Cheney’s top lawyer.
The purpose of the meeting was to argue a case whose details remain so classified that they are known by only a few people, but whose outcome, a decision known as In re: Sealed Case, has become one of the key documents in the hottest argument in Washington today: the fight over what President Bush calls the “terrorist surveillance” of persons with known al-Qaeda connections, and what the president’s opponents call “domestic spying.”
The three judges made up what is known as the FISA Court of Review. It was created in 1978 by the now-famous Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. The act required that the president go to the so-called FISA Court to seek a warrant for surveillance in top-secret foreign-intelligence cases. For any disputed decisions that might arise, Congress also created the Court of Review, a sort of super-secret appeals court.
But in all the years between 1978 and 2002, there had never been occasion for the Court of Review to actually meet. Not until Sealed Case, and the three-way collision between the executive, legislative, and judicial branches that it involved. Today, a look at the circumstances of the case provides not only an insight into the administration’s rationale for the secret, warrantless surveillance program but also important clues to the mystery of how the whole thing got started in the first place.
The conflict began with the passage of the Patriot Act in October 2001. The act tore down the “wall” that had arisen in the Justice Department that blocked intelligence officials and criminal investigators from working together and sharing information. That wall had been cemented by a set of internal department guidelines written in 1995, in which then–attorney general Janet Reno outlined the department’s constricted surveillance procedures.
The Patriot Act was designed to fix that problem. But a month after the act was passed, when the Justice Department submitted surveillance requests to the FISA Court under the new, looser standards passed by Congress, the FISA Court in effect rejected the Patriot Act, and instead reaffirmed the old 1995 Clinton-era standard.
A standoff ensued. In early 2002, the Justice Department adopted new surveillance procedures based on the Patriot Act. In March 2002, the department informed the FISA Court that it would use those new standards in surveillance applications. In May, the FISA Court said, in effect, not so fast, and ordered modifications in the procedures. Among other things, the FISA Court ordered that “law enforcement officials shall not make recommendations to intelligence officials concerning the initiation, operation, continuation or expansion of FISA searches or surveillances” — a reasonable facsimile of the old wall. The FISA Court also ordered that the Justice Department include certain staffers in all surveillance debates, an order that quickly became known in the Justice Department as the “chaperone requirement.”
The Justice Department resisted, and in July 2002 filed a surveillance application — the details are still a secret — using its new procedures, without the FISA Court’s mandated changes. The Court approved the application but insisted that the modifications be made according to the court’s dictates. And then, in August, the FISA Court took the extraordinary step of making its decision public, accusing the Justice Department of habitually misrepresenting evidence and misleading the court. That’s when the department decided to take the matter to the Court of Review, leading to the September 2002 session in that secure room in department headquarters.
“We’re here today,” Theodore Olson said as the secret In re: Sealed Case court argument began, “because the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court’s May 17th order . . . has perpetuated a serious and increasingly destructive barrier which has hamstrung the president and his subordinates” in their work to protect “the United States and its citizens from attack and from international terrorism.” The FISA Court’s ruling, Olson continued, was “inexplicable.”
Olson and the judges went back and forth over the history of the wall. Nobody really knew how it first came into being; the judges later said its origin was “shrouded in historical mist.” They went over what Congress intended when it passed the Patriot Act. And they went over the question of whether the FISA Court had the power to tell the president how to conduct investigations.
The answer was no, Olson said. “To the extent that the FISA Court is purporting to reorganize the executive branch, the so-called chaperone function, I don’t think Congress could constitutionally tell the executive or the attorney general that he could not talk to this subordinate without involving that subordinate,” Olson told the judges, “and I certainly don’t think the court can do so.”
The entire session lasted just a few hours, and the Justice Department waited for the Court of Review’s ruling. When it came, in November 2002, it was a slam-dunk win for the government.
In its opinion, the Court of Review said the FISA Court had, in effect, attempted to unilaterally impose the old 1995 rules. “In doing so, the FISA Court erred,” the ruling read. “It did not provide any constitutional basis for its action — we think there is none — and misconstrued the main statutory provision on which it relied.” The FISA Court, according to the ruling, “refus[ed] to consider the legal significance of the Patriot Act’s crucial amendments” and “may well have exceeded the constitutional bounds” governing the courts by asserting “authority to govern the internal organization and investigative procedures of the Department of Justice.”
And then the Court of Review did one more thing, something that has repercussions in today’s surveillance controversy. Not only could the FISA Court not tell the president how do to his work, the Court of Review said, but the president also had the “inherent authority” under the Constitution to conduct needed surveillance without obtaining any warrant — from the FISA Court or anyone else. Referring to an earlier case, known as Truong, which dealt with surveillance before FISA was passed, the Court of Review wrote: “The Truong court, as did all the other courts to have decided the issue, held that the President did have inherent authority to conduct warrantless searches to obtain foreign intelligence information. . . . We take for granted that the President does have that authority and, assuming that is so, FISA could not encroach on the President’s constitutional power.”
It was a clear and sweeping statement of executive authority. And what was most likely not known to the Court of Review at the time was that the administration had, in 2002, started a program in which it did exactly what the Court of Review said it had the power to do: order the surveillance of some international communications without a warrant.
Read today, In re: Sealed Case does more than simply outline the president’s authority. It also puts the administration’s warrantless-surveillance decision in some context. What was going on at the time the president made the decision to go ahead with the surveillance? Well, first Congress passed the Patriot Act, giving the administration new powers. Then the FISA Court refused to recognize those powers and attempted to impose outdated restrictions on the administration. Then the White House, faced with the FISA Court’s opposition — and with what administration officials believed were some inherent weaknesses in the FISA law — began to bypass the FISA Court in some cases. And then, in In re: Sealed Case, the administration received irrefutable legal support for its actions.
After the decision was handed down, the American Civil Liberties Union, which had submitted a brief in support of the FISA Court’s actions restricting the administration, asked the Supreme Court to review In re: Sealed Case. The justices declined to take any action. That is not the same as the Court’s upholding the ruling, but it does mean that the justices looked at the decision and chose not to intervene.
Today, the opinion stands as a bedrock statement of presidential power. And ironically, it came from a case that was not about whether the president had overstepped his bounds, but about whether the courts had overstepped their bounds. The Court of Review ruled strongly in favor of the president, and the Supreme Court declined to reconsider that decision. Reading the opinion, it’s no wonder that George W. Bush has so strongly defended the surveillance program. If the FISA Court of Review is right, he has the Constitution on his side.

15 Mar

Condi Looses Mind In Brazil

RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil

The United States hopes to find a way to increase humanitarian donations to the Palestinians following Hamas’ election victory, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said Sunday.
Rice said she will ask Indonesia, a moderate Muslim nation, to help press the message that the Palestinians must remain committed to peace with Israel even though Hamas refuses to accept the Jewish state’s right to exist.
“We are looking at ways to even increase our humanitarian assistance to the Palestinian people during this period of time,” Rice said.
Rice was not specific. But her comments suggested that the United States intends to replace money it once gave directly to the current moderate and secular Palestinian government with grants for charity work or other projects that are independent of the new government.
U.S. officials have nearly finished an extensive review of aid to the Palestinians that was intended to ensure that future aid does not flow to Hamas.
Hamas, which refuses to renounce violence and has claimed responsibility for dozens of suicide bombings against Israel, is listed as a terrorist organization by both the United States and the European Union.

Wild Thing’s comment……
OK I know she gets her talking points from da’ boss man. BUT, here is the thing, this is BS to even think about giving aid to the Hamas in any way, shape or form. We need to declare as a Nation that any group of Islamic terrorists, even if in power such as the Hamas, is our enemy if they do not recognize Israel, and if they refuse to renounce violence etc. I have a 12 year old nephew that understands this better then Condi Rice.
This half assed some are ok and some are not when it comes to terrorists is only making us weak and wimpy! Let’s call it the bada bing mentality is what is needed. The take no prisoners frame of mind and stick to it.
I don’t have balls and neither does Condi, but if we did, mine sure as hell would be bigger then hers! Screw this shit and stop making excuses for terrorists!
During the Vietnam War there was a saying, ” kill them all and let God sort them out”! I say Exactly!

* Anti-Idiotarian Rottweiler